What is Resiliency and Why is it So Important?

Mentoring for Resiliency

 

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Resiliency is the ability to overcome challenges of all kinds–trauma, tragedy, personal crises, plain ‘ole’ life problems–and bounce back stronger, wiser, and more personally powerful.

It’s important because this is what we need to do when faced with life’s inevitable difficulties. AND it’s important because there is a growing body of social science research that explains how: How can you bounce back, even from a lifetime of “risk factors” or very painful trauma or tragedy, and how can you help those you care about bounce back?

This is the most useful under-publicized research information everybody should know. There are steps you can take today and every day to make it more likely that you will bounce back from any problem or challenge “stronger, smarter & with more self-esteem…”and more likely your family and others you care about will bounce back, too.

My work and writing is dedicated to sharing these life-correcting, life-strengthening strategies.  My latest book, The Resiliency Workbook,  synthesizes my 20 years of studying resiliency into a useable-by-anyone format.  I am excited about this book because it makes the decades of social science research on how people can overcome accessible to everyone!

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Comments

  1. Hi Nan:
    As one who overcame a lot of risk factors (at least I have up to this point), I am very interested in this research. And as a scholar of the life and work of composer Billy Strayhorn, I am even more. Last spring in the work of Beverly Greene I ran across a reference to an article by one F. Jones that specifically discusses his biography in awareness of the work of psychologists working in this area of expertise. Here’s the cite:

    Jones, F. (1997, March). Eloquent anonymity [Review of
    the book Lush life: A biography of Billy Strayhorn]. Readings:
    A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental
    Health, 12, 10–14.

    I’ve exhausted every research tool I possess to find it, and can’t.
    Are you aware of this work? Do you know the case of Billy Strayhorn?
    I want to learn more!

    Best,
    Bruce

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